The Silver Decade

It seemed like only yesterday you could compare a dampened economy to the 1930s, that majestic decade where value faded and a dogged depression took its place. The Great Recession had its place among the pantheon of failed experiments, but at least it could be placed among the greats, and could relate to them. What is this unrecognizable state of civilization we find ourselves in? Some sunken far-right struggle against the liberal light? The economy is recovering, but hysteria over it continues, which obscures human rights abuses rationalized by anti-immigrant sentiments. A recovering but fledgling economy will be hampered by fragmented murmurs in the night that comprise ideologies.

But even during The Great Recession, you could refer to a great, devastating, lost decade. Nostalgia over references made everything sane again. The 1930s. At least there was that. Certainly this new world we find ourselves can’t find any similarities concerning civil rights abuses with the 1930s and its heavily exploited migrant farm workers and increased discrimination over jobs because competition allowed for that sort of thing.

The Great Recession must be a more relatable beacon of disaster. Shadow bankers, debt bubbles, housing bubbles, etc. Crushing debt and uncertainty leaves a more devastating toll than does a constant stream of civil rights abuses and xenophobia.

And then there is the majestic historical sweep we now live in, so incompatible with the chaos of the 30s. We are in the era of impeachment in one country, threats of it in another, and North Korean missiles gone awry, but these are signs of an encroaching peace not instability.

But maybe we can squeeze out a glop of uncertainty from this age so that it might compare with the mighty depression. Geert Wilders, Marine Le Pen, and Ahn-Cheol-soo loom large as doubt-inspiring suns illuminating a corridor from one age to another. All hope isn’t lost, you see. Perhaps if they band together, the sealing of a decade will be complete.

 

 

 

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s